A UNIQUE, OUTDOORS APPROACH

The Monthly Barometer is, to our knowledge, the only advisory boutique in the world to offer its clients the opportunity to work while walking, trekking, climbing or ski-touring. There is ample evidence in the scientific literature that walking is a cognitive enhancer. Indeed, the power of walking as a generative force of intellect, awareness, and creativity has been recognized by artists and scientists throughout the ages. Nietzsche even famously said: “All truly great thoughts are conceived by walking”.

In a spirit of putting its money where its mouth is the Monthly Barometer has recently become an investor in Mountain Path, a new venture that trades in experiential learning based on its unique formula of “Learning from altitude”. The solutions offered by Mountain Path reflect perfectly our conviction that the great outdoors has much to share with the world of investment not only in terms of an enhanced decision-making environment but also in terms of team and management dynamics.

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Click here for our book on the subject of how walking helps us make better decisions and much more:

“Ten Good Reasons to Go for a Walk”

“The benefits of walking are seemingly endless. As Thierry Malleret shows, we don’t just feel better when we walk, we think better, too. Using science along with compelling stories of famous walkers throughout history, Ten Good Reasons to Go for a Walk will get you off the couch to better navigate our stress-filled world.” (Arianna Huffington, Founder and CEO, Thrive Global, USA).

Read here two further short articles on how physical activity improves cognitive health and decision-making.

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Mark Twain rightly said that all ideas are second-hand. The rigorous methodology that underpins the Monthly Barometer draws on a variety of theories to achieve the most insightful and pertinent analysis possible.

The Wisdom of Crowds, by James Surowiecki, defends the idea that diversity makes a group more intelligent. Our network is both quantitative and qualitative and characterized by diversity. Diversity of opinion, diversity of information, and diversity of attitude. Thanks to this, we provide meaningful, independent, “conflict-of-interest-free” advice to our subscribers.

The “analysis of competing hypothesis”, a method developed and recommended by Senior Intelligence Officer Richard Heuer, is the conceptual framework we’ve chosen for the Monthly Barometer. The reason is this: as human beings, our judgment is plagued by our biases. We tend to form opinions by falling back on intuitions and then seek out evidence to confirm and comfort us in our position, shutting down any dissonant information. The “analysis of competing hypotheses” is a response to this problem. It works by formulating two opposing arguments about any given issue and examining fresh information to see which one is gaining ground – we do this by talking to our network and forcing ourselves to consider all sides of an argument. Each bullet point of the Monthly Barometer is subjected to this scrutiny. Thus armed, we form our opinion and express our conviction.

Thierry Malleret
Thierry Malleret
Founder
Philippe Bourguignon
Philippe Bourguignon
Partner
Olivier Fleurot
Olivier Fleurot
Partner
Carol Melton
Carol Melton
Partner
Ted Souder
Ted Souder
Partner
Blaise Agresti
Blaise Agresti
Partner, Summit of Minds

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Weekly Selection
08 November 2019

We are proud to include this piece that is largely based on a series of encounters that took place at our last Summit of Minds in Chamonix.
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Weekly Selection
1 November 2019

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Weekly Selection
25 October 2019

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Weekly Selection
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Weekly Selection
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