SUMMIT OF MINDS

“A unique experience combining insights, wellbeing and investible ideas with a focus on the great outdoors.”

NEXT: the Families Summit of Minds will take place in Quebec, Canada on
15-17 November, 2019

The most recent SUMMIT OF MINDS took place in Chamonix, France on
20-22 September, 2019

Every year, the Summit of Minds brings together 300 exceptional individuals
(drawn from the Monthly Barometer’s exclusive global network) in an exceptional place to:

- Better understand today’s world and our place in it -
- Get a sense of what tomorrow’s world will be like -
- Enhance our capacity to make better personal, investment and strategic decisions -

We set ourselves some ambitious goals – to inspire our guests with thought-provoking insights, to furnish them with tangible outcomes and to see them walk away from the Summit of Minds with at least:
a new idea | a new friend | a new project

Visit the Summit of Minds website for more information about upcoming summits and experiential travel.

View the 2019
Programme here

Get a taste of the 2019
Summit of Minds ‘conversation’

Go to the website for
more information

Once again, last year, our guests’ response to whether we had succeeded was a resounding “yes”! In 2018, 100% of our participants left Chamonix with a new idea and a new friend. Almost 80% initiated a new project (more often than not, a club-deal).

The Summit of Minds is by invitation only. To request an invitation, please email info@monthlybarometer.com

Our Weekly Selections

Weekly Selection
18 October 2019

Read Full Selection Here

Weekly Selection
11 October 2019

Lucrezia Reichlin, Adair Turner, Michael Woodford, Helicopter money as a policy option This article sums up a policy debate on helicopter money that took place six years ago among three of the world’s leading monetary economists. It is a bit technical but a must-read as central banks will soon run out of conventional policy options. It elaborates on one tool that has yet to be taken out of storage: ‘helicopter money’, i.e. the overt monetary financing of government deficits (reads in about 8-10 min).
Read Full Selection Here

Weekly Selection
04 October 2019

Lucrezia Reichlin, Adair Turner, Michael Woodford, Helicopter money as a policy option This article sums up a policy debate on helicopter money that took place six years ago among three of the world’s leading monetary economists. It is a bit technical but a must-read as central banks will soon run out of conventional policy options. It elaborates on one tool that has yet to be taken out of storage: ‘helicopter money’, i.e. the overt monetary financing of government deficits (reads in about 8-10 min).
Read Full Selection Here

Weekly Selection
27 September 2019

Arvind Subramanian and Dani Rodrik, The Puzzling Lure of Financial Globalization The two renowned economists observe that, although most of the intellectual consensus behind neoliberalism has collapsed, the idea that emerging markets should throw their borders open to foreign financial flows is still taken for granted in policymaking circles. They argue that until that changes, the developing world will suffer from unnecessary volatility, periodic crises, and lost dynamism (reads in 5-6 min).
Read Full Selection Here

Weekly Selection
20 September 2019

Satyajit Das, Can Banks Survive Negative Rates? The former banker turned author explains why the spread of unconventional monetary policies threatens to set off dangerous and unpredictable feedback loops in credit markets and the real economy, where the second and third-order effects are difficult to anticipate or control. The argument is a bit technical, but offered in palatable terms. In short: Instead of stimulating the economy, negative rates increase uncertainty about the future; therefore households, worried about saving for retirement and other goals, spend less (reads in about 5 min).
Read Full Selection Here

Weekly Selection
13 September 2019

Ann Saphir, Trade uncertainty to trim $850 billion global output: Fed paper Some robust academic research (it comes from the Fed) has attempted for the first time to quantify the economic impact of the uncertainty generated by the trade war. The result: USD850 billion in lost global output through early next year – roughly 1% of global GDP (reads in 3-4 min).
Read Full Selection Here